A short guide to networking in Virtual Box with Oracle Linux inside.

This post is intended to be a dummy guide, best practices, or whatever you call it…   about setting up a network while working with virtual boxes on a desk- or laptop. I was setting up a virtual box environment with several Virtual Boxes on my laptop, and as I’m not a network – specialist, I came across a few annoying things, challenges if you like.  And when I was googling around, it appeared to be I’m not the only one, so I felt the urge to share some experiences.

Already published this post on the amis-blog by the way, a long time ago. Decided to publish it also on my own blog.

What I want is the following environment and some elements smells like a subset of the real life:

1. Connect from my laptop to my virtual box through ssh and sqlplus, with fixed ip-address.

2. Simulate a private network, a network between the virtual boxes, also with fixed ip-addresses.

3. Occasionally connect to the internet from within the virtual boxes. To performs a ‘yum update’ and that kind of stuff.

 

Configuring a private DNS server on Openfiler for use with Oracle RAC 12C on Virtual Boxes

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This post has already been published in the past on the AMIS-blog.

To build an Oracle 12C RAC database – on Virtual Boxes – there’s at least shared storage needed for ASM, and a DNS-server for the SCAN-addresses. Several methods can be used for this, but  for the storage in my private project I chose Openfiler, an open source management storage tool, on a separate Virtual Box. It’s like a SAN in real life (the complete system will be three Virtual Boxes: two RAC-nodes and 1 storage Virtual Box). Version Openfiler: 2.99.

O.k. storage is clear, but what about DNS? The quickest and dirtiest way to accomplish this is to use Dnsmasq on every RAC-node. A nice blogpost about this subject is here to be found.

But what I want is a separate DNS-server, just as in real life. The perfect candidate is to use the separate Openfiler Virtual Box

By |June 7th, 2014|Categories: Database, RAC|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Licensing development and test environments

This post has already been published in the past on the AMIS technology blog.

Once in a while a company wants to know if her Oracle development- and test- environments needs to be licensed. And in a lot of cases this question simply can be answered as: yes, these environments must be licensed. The cases in which these licenses are not needed, are quite rare and a company should verify this with her Oracle representative or an intermediary.

Recently I bumped into such a lucky company, and I thought it’s a good reason to write about this. And as always when talking about licenses please take notice of the disclaimer in this article.

In this post I will first shortly point out why development- and test-environments need to be licensed according to Oracle, try to explain the ‘OTN Development license’ , describe the case of the lucky company and point out some consideration to make the costs of the environments maybe more bearable.

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By |May 17th, 2014|Categories: Database, licensing|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Licensing ODA on NUP’s ?

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Since Oracle launched the Oracle Database Appliance it is clear that only the Enterprise Edition is allowed on the machine. But for me it was still a little bit fuzzy if and what kind of licensing requirements is needed. More direct : may the ODA be licensed on NUP´s ? Some statements while investigating:

Documentation:

Customers are only required to license processor cores.

 

Licensing on processor cores, but not processor metric! Diving deeper….

By |April 23rd, 2013|Categories: licensing|Tags: , , |2 Comments

My project with Dbvisit Standby – basics

A while ago I made a promise to take a look at the product Dbvisit, found out this is not the product, but just the firm Dbvisit. The product I’m about to install is called officially ‘Dbvisit Standby‘. There’s also a product called ‘Dbvisit replicate’.
I didn’t really know about the product, not related to it, but it was buzzing around that it’s a cheap and a well working alternative for a high available environment with Oracle Standard Edition in stead of the Enterprise Edition with Data Guard.
So my first project (this post) is just to install a lab environment and get it working. The second project should be the real thing, testing the availability and the easiness of administration and monitoring.

What will I do for this part of the project (working from scratch with the latest versions – at the time of writing – of Oracle Linux and VirtualBox…):

1. Create two VM’s (VirtualBox with Oracle Linux 6)
2. Install Dbvisit Standby
3. Configure Dbvisit Standby
4. Get it going!

And not surprisingly, the preparation took most of the time:

By |March 31st, 2013|Categories: Database, Standby|Tags: , , , |2 Comments