Chargeback in Oracle Enterprise manager 13C

Since Oracle Enterprise Manager 12C it is possible to allocate the costs of IT resources to the people of organizations who consume them. This is done through the use of the plugin ‘Consolidation Planning and Chargeback’ .

Pete Sharman wrote an excellent blog about configuring  this plugin in Enterprise Manager 12c, and it’s not my intention to copy his work, so I’d like to focus on complementary stuff regarding Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c.

In this article a short note about how simple it is to install the plugin in OEM13c and of course some important new features within the plugin

Be aware that by using this plugin you need the Cloud Management Pack – license!

By |May 25th, 2016|Categories: Oracle Enterprise Manager|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Why go to a seminar or conference?

Developing a solid business case for going to a conference is not always easy. Most of the time the company culture dictates the succes-rate of your attempt.

The necessity for your own development is of great importance to you but is most of the time not the prevailing factor for the company. So how to convince your manager that it is of vital importance for the company that you will attend the conference ?

By |May 18th, 2016|Categories: Event Cal.|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Migrating Red Hat Linux subscription to Oracle

I never realized in depth the difference between a Linux subscription and a license. Linux is open source, so the software itself is for free. No license to use it is required. But when you buy a Linux support subscription, you are legally entitled to download the ISO images of the binary distribution, download bug fixes, raise bugs and get support from a distributor. Hmm… that sounds pretty much the same as a license. But… with a subscription you can switch to another, cheaper support provider for the same product. It’s quite the same as switching your energy-supplier to another company.

So why not change the subscription of Red Hat Linux to Oracle – without changing a bit of RHEL and no downtime involved. And save money, because the subscription of Oracle looks cheaper (!). The distribution of  Oracle Linux is binary compatible with Red Hat Linux, and will provide the same updates and errata.

Is it really that simple to save money? Or are there important pitfalls? Is it worth investigating for Red Hat based datacenters? And … is a Red Hat Linux, maintained by Oracle still a Red Hat Linux, or do you call it Oracle Linux with RHEL compatible kernel? Lots of questions. Let’s take a closer look.

By |March 19th, 2016|Categories: Architecture|Tags: , , , |1 Comment

Modifying BI Publisher reports in Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c, e.g. ‘Database Usage Tracking Summary’;

Recently I bumped into an annoying bug in the code of a report, wrote about it a while ago, notified Oracle. And they has confirmed that a new version of this specific report is in development phase.

But.. a report can be modified, so if it’s not that hard, why wait for a patch when you want to use a report you need in the meantime? It is is not advisable to modify a standard report, because undoubtedly there will be other changes in a patch to come (e.g. the datamodel), but as long you are aware of this…..

So I chose to modify my favourite report ‘Database Usage Tracking Summary’ for this blog.  And it turned out to be surprisingly simple.

By |February 27th, 2016|Categories: Oracle Enterprise Manager|Tags: , , |0 Comments

Oracle Public Cloud Confusion

I always thought I could address the main differences between private and public cloud. Oracle announced the ‘Oracle Private Cloud Machine’ at Oracle Open World 2015 which runs locally, offering a private cloud for an organization. Then Oracle decided to rename it to ‘Oracle Public Cloud Machine’.

And I think a public cloud has two important aspects: (1) resources are shared by multiple organizations and (2) services are available through a public network.

Does this new name make any sense? Where does this machine fit in? Is Oracle trying to change the definition of ‘public cloud’? They already renamed the ‘Oracle Virtual Compute Appliance’ to ‘Oracle Private Cloud Appliance’. This post is just a short reflection of my land of confusion.

By |February 19th, 2016|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , |0 Comments